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Drug Guide    A   Antihemophilic Factor

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   Antihemophilic Factor

Antihemophilic Factor
IV


This medication is used to control and prevent bleeding episodes in people with low levels of factor VIII (hemophilia A). It is also used in these patients before surgery to prevent bleeding. People with low factor VIII levels are at risk for bleeding longer after an injury/surgery and for bleeding inside the body (especially into the joints and muscles). This product contains human factor VIII, also called antihemophilic factor. This product is used to temporarily replace the missing factor VIII, a protein (clotting factor) that is normally in the blood, so that the blood can clot and the bleeding can stop.

 
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OverviewPhotosHow To UseSide EffectsPrecautionsMissed DoseDrug Interactions
Antihemophilic Factor

Uses
This medication is used to control and prevent bleeding episodes in people with low levels of factor VIII (hemophilia A). It is also used in these patients before surgery to prevent bleeding. People with low factor VIII levels are at risk for bleeding longer after an injury/surgery and for bleeding inside the body (especially into the joints and muscles). This product contains human factor VIII, also called antihemophilic factor. This product is used to temporarily replace the missing factor VIII, a protein (clotting factor) that is normally in the blood, so that the blood can clot and the bleeding can stop.
Notes
  • Do not share this medication with others.Laboratory blood tests (e.g., factor VIII levels) should be performed frequently to determine your dosage and to check how well this medication is working.
  • Consult your doctor for more details.

Storage
  • Store the medication according to the manufacturer's instructions.
  • Some brands of this medication are good for only several months if stored at room temperature.
  • Ask your pharmacist for more details.
  • Do not freeze this product or store it in the bathroom.
  • Protect the product from light.
  • After mixing, do not refrigerate the liquid.
  • Use it within 3 hours (unless the product instructions direct you otherwise) and throw away any unused portion.
  • Keep all medicines away from children and pets.


How To Use
  • This medication is given by injection into a vein, usually over 5 to 10 minutes or as directed by your doctor.
  • The medication may need to be given more slowly over a longer time depending on your dose and how you respond to it.After first receiving this medication in a hemophilia treatment center or hospital, some patients may be able to give this medication to themselves at home.
  • If your doctor directs you to give this medication at home, read the product information available from your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill.
  • Learn all preparation and usage instructions in the product package.
  • If you have any questions, ask your health care professional.If the medication and the solution used to mix it have been refrigerated, bring both to room temperature before combining.
  • After adding the solution to the powder, gently swirl the vial to completely dissolve the powder.
  • Do not shake the vial.
  • Before using this product, check it visually for particles or discoloration.
  • If either is present, do not use the liquid.
  • Use immediately (See also Storage).The dosage is based on your medical condition, weight, blood test results, and response to treatment.
  • Follow your doctor's instructions closely.
  • Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.Learn how to store and discard needles and medical supplies safely.
  • Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens.

Side Effects
  • Flushing of the face, nausea, vomiting, and fast heartbeat may sometimes occur and can be lessened by giving this medication more slowly.
  • Burning/redness/irritation at the injection site, fever, chills, and headache may also occur.
  • If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects.
  • Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: signs of anemia (e.g., tiredness, low energy, pale skin color, shortness of breath), new or worsening bleeding/bruising.This medication is made from human blood.
  • There is a very small chance that you may get infections from this medication (e.g., viral infections such as hepatitis), even though careful screening of blood donors, special manufacturing processes, and many tests are all used to reduce this risk.
  • Discuss the benefits and risks of treatment with your doctor.
  • Tell your doctor immediately if you develop any signs of hepatitis or other infection, including fever, persistent sore throat, unusual tiredness, unusual drowsiness, joint pain, persistent nausea/vomiting, stomach/abdominal pain, yellowing eyes/skin, dark urine.A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare.
  • However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching, swelling, severe dizziness, trouble breathing, chest discomfort/tightness.If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Precautions
  • Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to any antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) products; or to animal proteins (e.g., mouse); or to natural rubber/latex (found in the packaging of some brands); or if you have any other allergies.Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history.Manufacturers of some brands of this medication recommend that you monitor your heartbeat during treatment.
  • If your heart starts to beat faster, it is recommended that you give this medication more slowly or temporarily stop the infusion until your heart rate returns to normal.
  • Consult your doctor for more details.Since this medication is made from human blood, there is a very small chance that you may get infections from it (e.g., viral infections such as hepatitis).
  • It is recommended that you get the appropriate vaccinations (e.g., for hepatitis A and B) and that people giving this medication handle the medication with special caution to prevent virus infections.
  • Consult your doctor for more details.During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed.
  • Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.It is not known whether this drug passes into breast milk.
  • Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Missed Dose
  • It is important to follow the dosing schedule as directed by your doctor.
  • If you miss a dose, contact your doctor to establish a new dosing schedule.
  • Do not double the dose to catch up.

Drug Interactions
  • Your doctor or pharmacist may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for them.
  • Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with your doctor or pharmacist first.Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use.

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CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgement of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.

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